A Street level point of view.

Images captured on September, 28, 2009- Ondoy +2 days.

I went to visit an uncle yesterday in another part of Quezon City. I had heard before hand that their house had been submerged in the flood near the M.H. Del Pilar Street/Roosevelt Avenue area.

Driving through the guard house the street was already covered in a thick layer of mud and trash strewn about. Cars parked out on the curb were enveloped in a thin layer of dried mud stain, obviously submerged during the flooding.

As the street led me down the slight curve to the right I was stunned in disbelief. Cars, both old and new models were piled high forming a wall blocking the whole street. A sight I will never forget.

I backed up, parked my car nearby and walked the 2 blocks to my uncles house.

It used to be the drive way.

It used to be the drive way. Flood waters receded leaving mud everywhere.

The chain link acted as a trash filter when the flood reached over the height of this fence.

The chain link acted as a trash filter when the flood reached over the height of this fence.

Cleaning up but where to start?

Cleaning up but where to start?

Unlike our justice system, flood waters do not grant immunity.

Unlike our justice system, flood waters do not grant immunity.

Tidal surges left nothing unturned. Road too narrow for heavy equipment to dismantle the pyramid.

Tidal surges left nothing unturned. Road too narrow for heavy equipment to dismantle the pyramid.

Despite the humanly impossible, clean up begins. Surprisingly, the residents were in good spirits.

Despite the humanly impossible, clean up begins. Surprisingly, the residents were in good spirits.

“Hurricane Katrina dumped OVER AN INCH of rainfall in Louisiana for 3 hours and another 0.5 inches per hour over the next 5 hours on August 29, 2005. Ondoy dumped an AVERAGE OF 2.24 INCHES per hour for six hours… and is still going.” – Take a look at The Life & Times of The Renzie Man, he’s got good info.